Religion on the Move: Concepts, Methods, and Current Debates

Peggy Levitt

07.02.2013 | Mikkel Rytter

Dato ons 22 maj
Tid 12:15 14:00
Sted Aarhus, Nobelparken, building 1482, auditorium 105

Religion on the Move: Concepts, Methods, and Current Debates

Technology is just one engine propelling religions on the move. Migrants, pilgrims, social movement members, and scholars all carry religion. Religious objects, narratives, and spirits circulate actively and frequently within and between the layers of religious social fields. Yet we still talk of national religions—of American Protestantism or French Islam—or of self-contained, discrete congregations, organizations, or social movements. We take stasis and boundedness as the default categories for organizing religious life while, in fact, many religious ideas and practices are often and unabashedly in motion. In this talk, I will argue for the need to study religious movement and connection, and propose a way to analyze what happens when circulating religious elements encounter what is already in place. How can we explain what happens at these “sites of encounter” where what is circulating and what is in place come together? How do different national regimes of ethnic and religious diversity management affect how religion comes to ground?  What social and political work gets done, and whose interests are served when religion is conceptualized as a cohesive, bounded system as opposed to an unruly, clumsy collection that is constantly on the move?

Peggy Levitt is a Professor of Sociology at Wellesley College and a Research Fellow at The Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and the Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations at Harvard University, where se co-directs The Transnational Studies Initiative. 

For more information, please see her personal website 

 

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